Thursday, January 29, 2015





List of U.S. states by date of admission to the Union

This is a list of U.S. states by date of admission to the Union. Although the first 13 states can be considered to have been members of the United States from the date of the Declaration of Independence â€" July 4, 1776 â€" or from the date on which they ratified the Articles of Confederation, they are presented here as being "admitted" on the date each ratified the present United States Constitution; most other such lists, including the 50 State Quarters program, do the same.

The admission dates for later states were set by either the act of admission or a later resolution issued under that act, except for Ohio, whose date of admission was determined by act of Congress in 1953 as March 1, 1803, when its legislature first met because of a clerical error of omissionâ€"the original act omitted setting a date that the act took effect.

This list does not account for the secession of 11 states during the American Civil War to form the Confederate States of America, t




United States territorial acquisitions

This is a United States territorial acquisitions and conquests list, beginning with American independence. Note that this list primarily concerns land the United States acquired from other nation-states; the territorial acquisitions from Native Americans are not listed here.

History of North America Control


United States territorial acquisitions -History of North America Control

1783â€"1853


<img title="United States territorial acquisitions - 1783â€"1853" alt="United States territorial acquisitions -1783â€"1853 " style="width:400px;display:block;margin-left: auto;margin-right: auto" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/common

American Indian Wars

The American Indian Wars, or Indian Wars, were the multiple conflicts between American settlers or the United States government and the native peoples of North America from the time of earliest colonial settlement until 1890. In some cases, wars resulted from conflicts and competition for resources between the European colonists and Native Americans. There was population pressure as settlers expanded their territory, generally pushing indigenous people northward and westward. But, warfare and raiding also took place as a result of wars between European powers; in North America, they enlisted their Native American allies to help them conduct warfare against each other's settlements.

Many conflicts were local, involving disputes over land use, and some entailed cycles of reprisal. Particularly in later years, conflicts were spurred by ideologies such as Manifest Destiny, which held that the United States was destined to expand from coast to coast on the North Amer

Manifest destiny

In the 19th century, Manifest Destiny was the widely held belief in the United States that American settlers were destined to expand throughout the continent. Historians have for the most part agreed that there are three basic themes to Manifest Destiny:

  • The special virtues of the American people and their institutions;
  • America's mission to redeem and remake the west in the image of agrarian America;
  • An irresistible destiny to accomplish this essential duty.

Historian Frederick Merk says this concept was born out of "A sense of mission to redeem the Old World by high example...generated by the potentialities of a new earth for building a new heaven".

Historians have emphasized that "Manifest Destiny" was a contested conceptâ€"Democrats endorsed the idea but many prominent Americans (such as Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, and most Whigs) rejected it. Historian Daniel Walker Howe writes, "American imperialism did not repres

Natural and legal rights

Natural and legal rights are two types of rights. Legal rights are those bestowed onto a person by a given legal system. Natural rights are those not contingent upon the laws, customs, or beliefs of any particular culture or government, and therefore universal and inalienable (i.e., cannot be sold, transferred, or removed).

The concept of natural law is closely related to the concept of natural rights. During the Age of Enlightenment, the concept of natural laws was used to challenge the divine right of kings, and became an alternative justification for the establishment of a social contract, positive law, and government â€" and thus legal rights â€" in the form of classical republicanism. Conversely, the concept of natural rights is used by others to challenge the legitimacy of all such establishments.

The idea of human rights is also closely related to that of natural rights: some acknowledge no difference between the two, regarding them as synon